Argumentative Research Paper Example Apa 6th

APA stands for American Psychological Association, which is the largest scientific professional organization of psychologists in North America. The association has developed its own formatting style, which is called APA and is mostly used when writing essays, research papers in social & natural sciences. If you experience any difficulties with APA formatting - request help from our professionals!

Most current document governing the APA style is the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, Sixth Edition. The manual is available on the APA website; furthermore, there is plenty information available online.


APA REFERENCING TOOL


Writing an essay and formatting it to match APA style is the most frequent question students ask us. Unlike the MLA formatting, APA is used in social & natural sciences; naturally, a formatting style will inevitably differ from MLA.

One of the major differences is paper structure. APA style essay should consist of 4 major sections: title page, abstract, main body & references. For more serious APA style publications the structure will be somewhat different and will include: Title Page, Abstract, Introduction, Method, Results, Discussion, References, and Appendices.

This article is going to deal with such aspects of essay formatting as paper, title page, font, formatting, numbering, spacing, indentation, heading, citation, and references. Here you can see a detailed formatting of the APA cover page.

Paper. Your essay should be typed on clean, white sheet of A4 paper (8.5”x11”). Use one-inch margins on all sides. 

Title Page. This is one of the mandatory parts of your essay. Include the phrase ‘Running head:’ and type your paper title. Flush left. Press Enter eight times and write your title again, include your first & last name, your teaching institution & your professor. Center this block of text.

Numbering. Your paper should be numbered consecutively, starting from page 1. Page numbers should be placed in the upper right-hand corner. 

Spacing. Use double space throughout your essay.

Indentation. Paragraphs should be indented. Press TAB once.

Paragraphs. Indent paragraphs. Flush left.

Headings. Headings should be centered and capitalized.

Citation. Basic in-text citation narrows down to Author-Year style, for example:

The economic situation in most countries is forcing government departments to embrace change in order to survive (Gravenhorst, 2003).

Brunes & Jackson (2001) argue that success rates of organizational change efforts, however, have been found to be very low.

References. References come at the end of your paper. Once you are done writing, start a new page and title it ‘References’. Center your text. From a new line, list your references. Sort alphabetically. Your references will look like this:

DiFonzo, N. (2013). 10 Rumors during organizational change: a motivational analysis. The Psychology of Organizational Change: Viewing Change from the Employee's Perspective, 232.

The good news about APA referencing is that it is fully automatic now. Privatewriting has created a special APA referencing machine that automatically creates references based on the information you specify. At the end it allows you to download the references file as a separate file that you can simply attach to your paper or essay.

Formatting your essay to APA style is a great example of works that can be outsourced to professionals who work at privatewriting.com! We have hundreds of writers who are experts on APA style, they will save you time if you request formatting assistance from them. APA formatting can be ordered as a part of editing & proofreading services at Privatewriting.com.

Introductions, Body Paragraphs, and Conclusions for an Argument Paper

Summary:

This resource outlines the generally accepted structure for introductions, body paragraphs, and conclusions in an academic argument paper. Keep in mind that this resource contains guidelines and not strict rules about organization. Your structure needs to be flexible enough to meet the requirements of your purpose and audience.

Contributors: Allen Brizee
Last Edited: 2018-02-09 01:03:40

The following sections outline the generally accepted structure for an academic argument paper. Keep in mind that these are guidelines and that your structure needs to be flexible enough to meet the requirements of your purpose and audience.

You may also use the following Purdue OWL resources to help you with your argument paper:

Introduction

The introduction is the broad beginning of the paper that answers three important questions:

  1. What is this?
  2. Why am I reading it?
  3. What do you want me to do?

You should answer these questions by doing the following:

  1. Set the context –provide general information about the main idea, explaining the situation so the reader can make sense of the topic and the claims you make and support
  2. State why the main idea is important –tell the reader why he or she should care and keep reading. Your goal is to create a compelling, clear, and convincing essay people will want to read and act upon
  3. State your thesis/claim –compose a sentence or two stating the position you will support with logos (sound reasoning: induction, deduction), pathos (balanced emotional appeal), and ethos (author credibility).

For exploratory essays, your primary research question would replace your thesis statement so that the audience understands why you began your inquiry. An overview of the types of sources you explored might follow your research question.

If your argument paper is long, you may want to forecast how you will support your thesis by outlining the structure of your paper, the sources you will consider, and the opposition to your position. You can forecast your paper in many different ways depending on the type of paper you are writing. Your forecast could read something like this:

First, I will define key terms for my argument, and then I will provide some background of the situation. Next, I will outline the important positions of the argument and explain why I support one of these positions. Lastly, I will consider opposing positions and discuss why these positions are outdated. I will conclude with some ideas for taking action and possible directions for future research.

When writing a research paper, you may need to use a more formal, less personal tone. Your forecast might read like this:

This paper begins by providing key terms for the argument before providing background of the situation. Next, important positions are outlined and supported. To provide a more thorough explanation of these important positions, opposing positions are discussed. The paper concludes with some ideas for taking action and possible directions for future research.

Ask your instructor about what tone you should use when providing a forecast for your paper.

These are very general examples, but by adding some details on your specific topic, a forecast will effectively outline the structure of your paper so your readers can more easily follow your ideas.

Thesis checklist

Your thesis is more than a general statement about your main idea. It needs to establish a clear position you will support with balanced proofs (logos, pathos, ethos). Use the checklist below to help you create a thesis.

This section is adapted from Writing with a Thesis: A Rhetoric Reader by David Skwire and Sarah Skwire:

Make sure you avoid the following when creating your thesis:

  • A thesis is not a title: Homes and schools (title) vs. Parents ought to participate more in the education of their children (good thesis).
  • A thesis is not an announcement of the subject: My subject is the incompetence of the Supreme Court vs. The Supreme Court made a mistake when it ruled in favor of George W. Bush in the 2000 election.
  • A thesis is not a statement of absolute fact: Jane Austen is the author of Pride and Prejudice.
  • A thesis is not the whole essay: A thesis is your main idea/claim/refutation/problem-solution expressed in a single sentence or a combination of sentences.
  • Please note that according to the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, Seventh Edition, "A thesis statement is a single sentence that formulates both your topic and your point of view" (Gibaldi 42). However, if your paper is more complex and requires a thesis statement, your thesis may require a combination of sentences.

Make sure you follow these guidelines when creating your thesis:

  • A good thesis is unified:
    • NOT: Detective stories are not a high form of literature, but people have always been fascinated by them, and many fine writers have experimented with them

(floppy). vs.

  •  
    • BETTER: Detective stories appeal to the basic human desire for thrills (concise).

  • A good thesis is specific:
    • NOT: James Joyce’s Ulysses is very good. vs.

    • BETTER: James Joyce’s Ulysses helped create a new way for writers to deal with the unconscious.

  • Try to be as specific as possible (without providing too much detail) when creating your thesis:
    • NOT: James Joyce’s Ulysses helped create a new way for writers to deal with the unconscious. vs.

    • BETTER: James Joyce’s Ulysses helped create a new way for writers to deal with the unconscious by utilizing the findings of Freudian psychology and introducing the techniques of literary stream-of-consciousness.

Quick Checklist:

_____ The thesis/claim follows the guidelines outlined above

_____ The thesis/claim matches the requirements and goals of the assignment

_____ The thesis/claim is clear and easily recognizable

_____ The thesis/claim seems supportable by good reasoning/data, emotional appeal

Categories: 1

0 Replies to “Argumentative Research Paper Example Apa 6th”

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *